OKC Sunrise Rotary

OKC Sunrise

Service Above Self

1st & 3rd Thursday @ 7am
Hampton Inn
920 SW 77th Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73139
United States
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March 2019
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 Chase Parsons is inviting you to the Big Event for the OKC Dream Center, Night of Dreams. This evening is an amazing night of celebrating another year of transformed lives and dreams coming true through Dream Center programs. Chase has a table reserved and is asking some of the club members to join him. Please email Chase at chase@dcokc.org with your RSVP. 

One of the things I appreciate most about serving as president of Rotary International is the people I get to meet. Much of my time is spent traveling and visiting Rotary clubs around the world. A Rotarian welcome is something quite special. But let me tell you, there's nothing so warm as the welcomes that have been rolled out for me by Rotaractors. These are young people who are committed to Rotary ideals, who are pouring their hearts into service, and who, in the process, don't forget to have fun.

One of the highlights of my recent travels was a trip to Ghana, where I visited a district that boasts some 60 Rotaract clubs. They aren't satisfied with that number, though — in fact, they're excited about a plan to double it. They'll do it, too.

Rotaractors are vaccinating children against polio. They're donating blood where the supply is dangerously low. They're providing handwashing facilities to schools where children previously had no way to get clean. In short, they're all about transformational service: carrying out projects that make a real difference in their communities.

In Nakivale, Uganda, one special Rotaract club is making a difference in its community — which happens to be a refugee settlement. These young leaders are turning what others might see as disadvantages into opportunities for service, building community and opening up new possibilities to those who are most in need of them.

In Turkey, Rotaractors are visiting children in the hospital every Wednesday to lift their spirits by playing games with them. They also are mentoring new students at their university and teaching them leadership skills.

Rotaractors are blazing the path for Rotary to be more relevant in this new century of service. And World Rotaract Week, which we're celebrating 11-17 March, is the perfect opportunity to get to know your local Rotaractors and talk to them about how your clubs can work together. If your Rotary club doesn't already sponsor a Rotaract club, know that you don't need to be near a college or university to do it: Community-based Rotaract clubs are a great option. And remember that Rotaractors are part of the Rotary family.

When Rotaractors are ready to leave their Rotaract club, we don't want them to leave that Rotary family behind. I'm asking all Rotarians to help them make the transition into a Rotary club or to start a new one: I'm happy to charter as many new clubs as we need to give everyone a place where they feel at home while making the world a little better. Service should be fun, it should be inspirational, and it should be open to all.

If there's one thing Rotary has always excelled at, it's diversity. In the past, that often meant diversity of profession, nationality, and outlook. We've made great strides when it comes to diversity of age and gender, and as we welcome more Rotaractors into our organization, we'll become even stronger.

Rotary is powerful. Together with Rotaract, it is unstoppable. Working side by side, we have the potential to Be the Inspiration in every part of society, to every person we meet.

Roosevelt Middle School, part of Oklahoma City Public Schools formed the District’s newest Interact Club recently. The Interact club is sponsored by OKC Sunrise Rotary and one of Sunrise’s own members, Felix Linden will be the faculty sponsor.
 
Marty Postic, PDG and current Interact Chair presented the charter to the school during the Induction Ceremony in late January. “We are excited to have over 100 more students join Interact; and we look forward to working with the Roosevelt school” said Mr. Postic. Other members from OKC Sunrise were in attendance and spent time with the students. Present were Club President, Gareth Williams, President Elect, Margie Bone, John Baker, Jim Browning, Bob Frakes, Felix Linden, and District Governor Elect, Lance Singleton.
 
Also, on hand were the Co-Presidents of the Classen School of Advanced Studies Interact club. Both Don Nguyen and Chau Phan shared their experience as an Interactor and participation with the OKC Sunrise Rotary on several service projects. Gaining leadership skills and learning from Rotarians has been a very rewarding experience both stated.
 
Interact clubs bring together young people ages 12-18 to develop leadership skills while discovering the power of Service Above Self. Interact clubs organize at least two projects every year, one that helps their school or community and one that promotes international understanding. Rotary club sponsors mentor and guide Interactors as they carry out projects and develop leadership skills.
 
Currently, there are 468,556 Interactors in 20,372 clubs throughout 159 countries.

Female surveillance officer for WHO pushes through gender-related obstacles to help end polio in Pakistan

By 
 

Dr. Ujala Nayyar dreams, both figuratively and literally, about a world that is free from polio. Nayyar, the World Health Organization's surveillance officer in Pakistan’s Punjab province, says she often imagines the outcome of her work in her sleep.

In her waking life, she leads a team of health workers who crisscross Punjab to hunt down every potential incidence of poliovirus, testing sewage and investigating any reports of paralysis that might be polio. Pakistan is one of just two countries that continue to report cases of polio caused by the wild virus. 

Dr. Ujala Nayyar, surveillance officer for WHO, talks about polio eradication efforts in Pakistan. 

In addition to the challenges of polio surveillance, Nayyar faces substantial gender-related barriers that, at times, hinder her team's ability to count cases and take environmental samples. From households to security checkpoints, she encounters resistance from men. But her tactic is to push past the barriers with a balance of sensitivity and assertiveness.  

"I'm not very polite," Nayyar said with a chuckle during an interview at Rotary's World Polio Day last year in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. "We don't have time to be stopped. Ending polio is urgent and time-sensitive."

RI President-elect Mark Daniel Maloney’s theme for 2019-20, Rotary Connects the World, asks Rotarians to strengthen the many ways that Rotary Connects the World, building the connections that allow talented, thoughtful, and generous people to unite and take meaningful action through Rotary service.
 

Mark Daniel Maloney is a principal in the law firm of Blackburn, Maloney, and Schuppert LLC, with a focus on taxation, estate planning, and agricultural law. He represents large farming operations in the Southeastern and Midwestern United States, and has chaired the American Bar Association’s Committee on Agriculture in the section of taxation. He is a member of the American Bar Association, Alabama State Bar Association, and the Alabama Law Institute.

He has been active in Decatur’s religious community, chairing his church’s finance council and a local Catholic school board. He has also served as president of the Community Foundation of Greater Decatur, chair of Morgan County Meals on Wheels, and director of the United Way of Morgan County and the Decatur-Morgan County Chamber of Commerce.

A Rotarian since 1980, Maloney has served as an RI director; Foundation trustee and vice chair; and aide to 2003-04 RI President Jonathan Majiyagbe. He also has participated in the Council on Legislation as chair, vice chair, parliamentarian, and trainer. He was an adviser to the 2004 Osaka Convention Committee and chaired the 2014 Sydney Convention Committee.

Prior to serving as a district governor, Maloney led a Group Study Exchange to Nigeria.

He also served as Future Vision Committee vice chair; regional Rotary Foundation coordinator; Foundation training institute moderator; Foundation permanent fund national adviser; member of the Peace Centers Committee; and adviser to the Foundation’s Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Schools Target Challenge Committee.

 
 

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