OKC Sunrise Rotary

OKC Sunrise

Service Above Self

1st & 3rd Thursday @ 7am
Hampton Inn
920 SW 77th Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73139
United States
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September 2018
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Club Executives & Directors
President
Treasurer
Secretary
Immediate Past President
Foundation Chair
Membership
 
Speakers
Tony Carfang
Sep 20, 2018 7:00 AM
Bicycle Safety
Club Social
Sep 27, 2018 5:30 PM
Wheeler District, 1701 S Western Ave, OKC 73109
 
 
 
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Home Page Stories
 

EVANSTON, Ill. (August 15, 2018) — Rotary today announced nearly $100 million in grants to support the global effort to end polio, a vaccine-preventable disease that once paralyzed hundreds of thousands of children each year. 

The announcement comes as Nigeria marks two years without any reported cases of wild poliovirus, following four reported cases in 2016.

“The fact that no new cases of wild poliovirus have been detected in Nigeria points to the improved surveillance and rapid response protocols Rotary and its Global Polio Eradication Initiative partners have established, particularly in insecure and inaccessible areas,” said Michael K. McGovern, chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee. “While this progress is promising, it’s time to redouble our efforts so we can continue to maintain the political and financial support necessary to end polio for good.”

 

By Francis Xavier Sentamu, District 9211 (Uganda) governor-elect

When I first saw a story on BBC in the spring of 2016 about the Nakivale Refugee settlement, I didn’t give it much thought. It was distant to me. Somewhat coincidentally, I attended a “changemaker” event that November organized by the American Refugee Committee, where 13 youth from the Nakivale Refugee settlement were being honored for their project ideas to impact the refugee community.

Sam Owori (who passed away in July of 2017), was at the event as RI president-nominee and was so impressed by the enthusiasm and determination of these youth that he got the idea right at that moment of organizing them into a Rotaract club.

Together with Angela Eifert from the Rotary Club of Roseville, Minnesota, and staff at the American Refugee Committee, we took on the challenge. Both Angela and I began our Rotary journey as Rotaractors. And I saw the opportunity to impact and mentor youth who are critically in need.

I was even more encouraged by the zeal I saw in them. I must say, it was exciting to see young people who refused to be held back by their status as a refugee, but were determined to change their lives and serve their community.

 
 

A well-known saying goes, "If you want to change the world, go home and love your family." That doesn't mean people should ignore the needs outside their own homes; instead, they should pay attention to the needs within.

It can be tempting, when our priority is service, to focus only on the things that look like service: the projects, the planning, the work that yields a visible benefit to those who need it. But to do that work effectively, we need to keep our own house in order. In Rotary, that means conducting ourselves in accordance with the principles of Rotary, treating others with respect, and following The Four-Way Test. It means maximizing our impact by planning carefully and stewarding our resources wisely. And it means looking after the long-term health of our organization by ensuring that our membership is strong, engaged, and healthy.

Our membership has hovered around the same 1.2 million mark for 20 years. We aren't growing, and our membership is getting older. We have too many clubs that don't have the knowledge or motivation to have an impact: clubs that don't know what we're doing on a global level, clubs that don't know about our programs or our Foundation, that don't even know how to get involved. And with a membership that is still mostly male, we clearly aren't doing enough to become the organization of choice for women who are seeking to serve.

We are a membership organization first. If we want to achieve the goals we've set for ourselves, we need to put membership first. All of us have a responsibility to take membership seriously, not only by inviting prospective members, but also by making sure new members are welcomed into clubs that offer them something of value. If you see someone walk into a meeting and hesitate, be sure that person has a place to sit and is part of the conversation. If you're enthusiastic about a Rotary program, make sure your club knows about it and knows how to get involved. If you see a need in your community, talk about it at this week's meeting. If we want to be part of an organization that's strong, that's active, that's having an impact – start at home, and Be the Inspiration in Rotary.

 
 

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