OKC Sunrise Rotary

OKC Sunrise

Service Above Self

1st & 3rd Thursday @ 7am
Hampton Inn
920 SW 77th Street
Oklahoma City, OK  73139
United States
DistrictSiteIcon
District Site
VenueMap
Venue Map
 
April 2018
S M T W T F S
01
02
03
04
06
07
08
09
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
27
28
29
30
01
02
03
04
05
 
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
Treasurer
Secretary
Immediate Past President
Foundation Chair
Membership
 
Email
Enter your email address and the message you want to send.
* fields are required
 
Speakers
TBD
Apr 19, 2018
Club Social - LTOTM
Apr 26, 2018
Fassler Hall - 421 NW 10th St
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
Treasurer
Secretary
Immediate Past President
Foundation Chair
Membership
 
Home Page Stories

Rotary International and the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy are conducting the last installment of the series: “Sustaining the Long Peace” on 10 April at Rotary’s World Headquarters in Evanston, Illinois.

Join us to hear from the next generation of peace builders who are working in communities to address challenges from a record migrant population to increasing unrest with global institutions of governance.

Speakers at the TEDx style event include Abdikheir Ahmed, former Rotary peace fellow and director of Immigration Partnership Winnipeg Program; Susan Stigant, director of African programs at the United States Institute of Peace; Kristen R. Hajduk, adjunct counterterrorism fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies; and Hafsah Lak, deputy team leader, Chief Minister’s Strategic Reforms Unit in Pakistan.

At the 1990 Rotary International Convention in Portland, Oregon, then President-elect Paulo Costa told the gathered Rotarians, "The hour has come for Rotary to raise its voice, to claim its leadership, and to rouse all Rotarians to an honorable crusade to protect our natural resources." He declared a Rotary initiative to "Preserve Planet Earth," asking Rotarians to make environmental issues part of their service agenda: to plant trees, to work to keep our air and water clean, and to protect the planet for future generations.
 
President Costa asked that one tree be planted for each of the 1.1 million members that Rotary had at the time. We Rotarians, as is our wont, did better, planting nearly 35 million trees by the end of the Rotary year. Many of those trees are likely still flourishing today, absorbing carbon from the environment, releasing oxygen, cooling the air, improving soil quality, providing habitat and food for birds, animals, and insects, and yielding a host of other benefits. Unfortunately, while those trees have kept on doing good for the environment, Rotary as a whole has not carried its environmental commitment forward.
 
That is why, at the start of this year, I followed Paulo Costa's example and asked Rotary to plant at least one tree for every Rotary member. My goal was to achieve a good beyond the considerable benefits that those 1.2 million (or more!) trees would themselves bring. It is my hope that by planting trees, Rotarians will renew their interest in, and attention to, an issue that we must put back on the Rotary agenda: the state of our planet.
 
Environmental issues are deeply entwined in every one of our areas of focus and cannot be dismissed as not Rotary's concern. Pollution is affecting health across the globe: More than 80 percent of people in urban areas breathe unsafe air, a number that rises to 98 percent in low- and middle-income countries. If current trends continue, by 2050 the oceans are expected to contain more plastics by weight than fish. And rising temperatures are well-documented: Global annual average temperatures increased by about 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) from 1880 through 2015. That this change was caused by humans is not a subject of scientific debate, nor is the likelihood of vast economic and human disruption if the trend continues unchecked. The need for action is greater than ever – and so is our ability to have a real impact.
 
As past UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon put it, "There can be no Plan B, because there is no Planet B." Our planet belongs to all of us, and to our children, and to their children. It is for all of us to protect, and for all of us in Rotary to make a difference.
RI President-elect Barry Rassin’s theme for 2018-19, Be the Inspiration, asks Rotarians to inspire change in the world and in each other. “I ask all of you to Be the Inspiration to help Rotary move from reaction to action — to take a hard look at the environmental issues that affect health and welfare around the world and do what we can to help.”
 

Barry Rassin

President 2018-19

Rotary Club of East Nassau

New Providence, Bahamas

Barry Rassin earned an MBA in health and hospital administration from the University of Florida, and is the first fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives in the Bahamas. He recently retired after 37 years as president of Doctors Hospital Health System and continues as an adviser. He is a lifetime member of the American Hospital Association and has served on several boards, including the Quality Council of the Bahamas, Health Education Council, and Employer’s Confederation.

A Rotarian since 1980, Rassin has served Rotary as director and is vice chair of The Rotary Foundation Board of Trustees. He was an RI training leader and the aide to 2015-16 RI President K.R. Ravindran.

Rassin received Rotary's highest honor, the Service Above Self Award, as well as other humanitarian awards for his work leading Rotary’s relief efforts in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake there. He and his wife, Esther, are Major Donors and Benefactors of The Rotary Foundation.

 
 
 

Facebook Like Button